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American Soap Operas, Spring 2008
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The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ford, Samuel
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Collaborative Consultation and Larger Systems, Fall 2007
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How do individuals and families interface with larger systems, and how do therapists intervene collaboratively? How do larger systems structure the lives of individuals and families? Relationally-trained practitioners are attempting to answer these questions through collaborative and interdisciplinary, team-focused projects in mental health, education, the law, and business, among other fields. Similarly, scholars and researchers are developing specific culturally responsive models: outreach family therapy, collaborative health care, multi-systemic school interventions, social-justice-oriented and spiritual approaches, organizational coaching, and consulting, among others. This course explores these developments and aims at developing a clinical and consulting knowledge that contributes to families, organizations, and communities within a collaborative and social-justice-oriented vision.

Subject:
Management
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gonzalo Bacigalupe
Date Added:
05/23/2019
The Coming Years, Spring 2008
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" Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies."

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rising, James
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Cultural Mapping in Montgomery County
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The United Nations Sustainable Development goals open pedagogy fellowship wants to ensure equitable resources and education to everyone regardless of racial
background and one’s locality. The target goals that will be targeted in this assignment are: • Target 4.7, 4.A: Ensure both culture's contribution to sustainable
development and access to • Facilities that are inclusive, just, and effective learning environments for all Disciplines: Sociology, Biology, Intercultural Competences

Instructions: Sociology & Criminology are two disciplines focused around understanding interactions and the enforcement of laws. Sociology is the scientific study of large (macro) and small (micro) groups, how those groups interact and influence the advancement of society and humanity.

Subject:
Criminal Justice
Sociology
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Emerald Jones
Date Added:
03/02/2021
Defense Politics, Spring 2006
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This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. It examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States and analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sapolsky, Harvey
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Epidemiological Thinking For Non-Specialists, Fall 2007
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Introduction to methods and problems in research and applications where quantitative data is analyzed to reconstruct possible pathways of development of behaviors and diseases. Special attention given to social inequalities, changes over the life course, heterogeneous pathways, and controversies with implications for policy and practice. Case studies and course projects are shaped to accommodate students with interests in fields related to health, gerontology, education, psychology, sociology, and public policy. Students are assumed to have a statistical background, but the course emphasizes the ability to frame the questions in order to collaborate well with statistical specialists; the goal is methodological "literacy" not technical expertise.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Assessment
Case Study
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Professor Peter Taylor
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Feminist Politics
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Throughout the course, we will examine and discuss questions important to feminist politics, such as citizenship, political participation, and political rights; work and family; reproductive rights and birth control; gender representation in the media; and finally, the role of gender in militarism and national security. In considering each topic, we will draw on historical analysis and seek to consider the variety of womenĺÎĺs experiences. Though this course will focus on feminism in the U.S., we will also attempt to incorporate international perspectives on women and feminism.

Subject:
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Feminization of Migration (Creating a Website to Raise Awareness about Trafficking of Women and Children)
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This assignment is a collegewide effort to increase access to education and empower students through “open pedagogy”. Open pedagogy is a “free access” educational practice that places the students at the center of their own learning, in an engaging, collaborative learning environment. The ultimate purpose of this effort is to achieve greater social justice in our community in which the work can be freely shared with the broader community. This is a renewable assignment that is designed to enable students to become an agent of change in their community through the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Goals (SDGs). For this assignment, the students will integrate the disciplines of sociology of gender, anthropology and psychology to achieve SDG #10, “Reduced Inequalities”. In this learning assignment students will be looking at migration processes with a female focus and looking deeper into poverty, inequality, discrimination, and exploitation. Students will choose a country of study and discuss the relevance of the theory of intersectionality in the context of the feminization of migration, particularly the vulnerability of female migrant workers to gender-based violence.

Subject:
Anthropology
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Gadis Arivia Effendi
Date Added:
03/02/2021
Food, Health & Race: Reduced Inequalities
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Learning Outcomes:
◦ Biology: Identify the structure and functions of macro-molecules important to living things
◦ Sociology: Identify components of culture and understand how structural inequalities impact individuals
◦ Biology: Analyze and interpret experimental results to reinforce biological principles
◦ Sociology: students will understand how social factors contribute to disparate health outcomes
◦ Biology: Apply basic mechanisms of heredity to predict inheritance of traits.
◦ Sociology: Students will gain a practical understanding of race as a social construct.

Subject:
Biology
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Montgomery College Open Pedagogy
Author:
Dr. Katya Salmi
Dr. Vedham Karpakakunjaram
Date Added:
10/23/2019
Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions, Fall 2011
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A truly inter-disciplinary course, Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions reviews how law, economics, sociology, political science, and planning conceptualize urban land and property rights and uses cases to discuss what these different lenses illuminate and obscure. It also looks at how the social sciences might be informed by how design, cartography, and visual studies conceptualize space's physicality. This year's topics include land trusts for affordable housing, mixed-use in public space, and critical cartography.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Annette M.
Kim
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences
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Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences uses a family systems lens to discuss challenges and strengths of immigrant and refugee families in the United States. Chapters address immigration policy, human rights issues, economic stress, mental health and traumatic stress, domestic violence, substance abuse, family resilience, and methods of integration.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Catherine Solheim
Elizabeth Wieling
Jaime Ballard
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Introduction to Sociology
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Sociology is the study of human social life. Human social life is complex and encompasses many facets of the human experience. Because of the complexity, the discipline of sociology subdivided over time into specialty areas. The first section of this book covers the foundations of sociology, including an introduction to the discipline, the methods of study, and some of the dominant theoretical perspectives. The remaining chapters focus on the different areas of study in sociology.

Introduction to Sociology is a featured book on Wikibooks because it contains substantial content, it is well-formatted, and the Wikibooks community has decided to feature it on the main page or in other places. Note: See "Instructor Resources" to find a list of Course Adoptions and accompanying PPTs.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Introduction to Sociology
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Introduction to Sociology is intended for a one-semester introductory sociology course. Conceived of and developed by active sociology instructors, this up-to-date title and can be downloaded now by clicking on the "Get this book" button below. This online, fully editable and customizable title includes sociology theory and research; real-world applications; simplify and debate features; and learning objectives for each chapter

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Eric Strayer
Faye Jones
Gail Scaramuzzo
Jeff Bry
Nathan Keirns
Sally Vyain
Susan Cody-Rydezerski
Tommy Sadler
Date Added:
02/23/2015
Introduction to Sociology
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This course is designed to introduce you to a range of basic sociological principles so that you can develop your own sociological imagination. You will learn about the origins of sociology as a discipline and be introduced to major sociological theories and methods of research. You will also explore such topics as sex and gender, deviance, and racism.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Introduction to Sociology Course Content
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The Introduction to Sociology Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2018. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS021. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadIrene Petten                                                Columbus State Community CollegeContent Contributors Dee Malcuit                                                 Clark State Community CollegeKwaku Oboso-Mensah                               Lorain County Community CollegeAnjel Stough-Hunter                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityLibrarianSherri Saines                                              Ohio UniversityReview TeamEric Jorrey                                                 Central Ohio Technical College 

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Applying the sociological perspectives to aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.3The content in section 12.3 will clearly state the assumptions of disengagement, activity, and conflict theories of aging and critically assess these three sociologicaly theories as they relate to aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Critique the characteristics and challenges of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.4This section of the chapter will describe the differences in life expectancy around the world.List the potential problems associated with the growing proportion of older individuals in poor nations.Explain the evidence for inequality in U.S. life expectancy.Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.5This section of the chapter describes the four biological changes associated with aging.List any three steps that individuals can try to undertake to achieve successful aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Discuss aging and the elderly, the impact on domestic and global societies
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.1-12.6The study of aging is so important and popular that it has its own name, gerontology. Social gerontology is the study of the social aspects of aging (Hooyman & Kiyak, 2011).The scholars who study aging are called gerontologists. The people they study go by several names, most commonly “older people,” “elders,” and “the elderly.” The latter term is usually reserved for those 65 or older, while “older people” and “elders” (as the headline of the opening news story illustrates) often include people in their 50s as well as those 60 or older.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Identify the global impact and future of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialsSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.6This section will cover:Presenting a brief sociodemographic profile of the U.S. elderly.Discuss the several problems experienced by the U.S. elderly.Describe how the social attitudes of older Americans generally differ from those of younger Americans.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Identify traditions and stereotypes of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Chapter 12: “Aging and the Elderly” The perception of aging can vary from one society to another, and it can also change over time within any given society. Gerontologists have investigated these cross-cultural and historical differences. By understanding aging in other societies and also in our past, they say, we can better understand aging in our own society. To acquaint you with “other ways of growing old” (Amoss & Harrell, 1981), we discuss briefly some of the cross-cultural and historical evidence on the perception and experience of aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Apply the structural functionalist, social conflict and symbolic interactionist perspectives to explain the meaning and purpose of culture.
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OER Text materialTheoretical Perspectives on CultureChapter 3, subsection 3.4. According to functionalists, societies need culture to exist. Cultural norms function to support the fluid operation of society, and cultural values guide people in making choices. In addition, culture exists to meet its members’ basic needs. Conflict theorists view social structure as inherently unequal, based on power differentials related to issues like class, gender, race, and age. For a conflict theorist, culture is seen as reinforcing issues of "privilege" for certain groups based upon race, sex, class, etc. Symbolic interactionism is mostly concerned with the face-to-face interactions between members of society. Interactionists see culture as being created and maintained by the ways people interact and in how individuals interpret each other’s actions.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Define culture
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OER Text materialWhat is Culture?Chapter 3, subsection 3.1Culture is defined as shared beliefs, values, and practices, that participants in a society must learn. Sociologically, we examine in what situation and context certain behavior is expected, and in which situations perhaps it is not. Rules are created and enforced by people who interact and share culture. Culture consists of thoughts (expectations about personal space, for example) and tangible things (bus stops, trains, and seating capacity).General Comments:Types of sanction should be clearly identifiedSymbol should be defined in more detail. It should be made clear that symbols, like the American flag, represent something else. Thus, the American flag is not just a piece of cloth; rather, it represents American pride, etc.   

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of culture.
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OER Text materialElements of CultureChapter 3, subsection 3.2. This learning objective is addressed variously in the chapter. For example, under elements of culture, beliefs, values, idea culture, real culture, norms, etc. are addressed. Values are defined as a culture’s standard for discerning what is good and just in society. Values are deeply embedded and critical for transmitting and teaching a culture’s beliefs. Beliefs are the tenets or convictions that people hold to be true.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Explain the impact of culture on human behavior and worldview
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OER Text MaterialPop Culture, Subculture, and Cultural ChangeChapter 3, subsection 3.3. Human behavior and worldview are impacted by culture and cultural changes. For example, people are influenced by both high culture and popular culture. Due to the integration of international trade and finance markets (globalization) people have adopted different cultures. Alongside the process of globalization is diffusion, or the spread of material and nonmaterial culture. While globalization refers to the integration of markets, diffusion relates to a similar process in the integration of international cultures.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Explain the primary forces that produce cultural change.
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OER Text materialCultural ChangeChapter 3, subsection 3.3. The concepts of innovation, discovery, and invention are used to explain cultural change. An innovation refers to an object or concept’s initial appearance in society—it is innovative because it is markedly new. There are two types of innovation: discovery and invention. Discoveries make known previously unknown but existing aspects of reality. Inventions result when something new is formed from existing objects or concepts—when things are put together in an entirely new manner.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Identify material and nonmaterial cultural elements and explain their relevance in society.
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OER Text materialWhat Is Culture? Chapter 3, subsection 3.1. A subsection of this section notes that culture consists of thoughts (expectations about personal space, for example) and tangible things (bus stops, trains, and seating capacity). Then material culture is defined as the objects or belongings of a group of people. Examples of material culture are given as metro passes, bus tokens, automobiles, stores, and the physical structures where people worship. Nonmaterial culture, in contrast, consists of the ideas, attitudes, and beliefs of a society. Material and nonmaterial aspects of culture are linked, and physical objects often symbolize cultural ideas. A metro pass is a material object, but it represents a form of nonmaterial culture, namely, capitalism, and the acceptance of paying for transportation. Clothing, hairstyles, and jewelry are part of material culture, but the appropriateness of wearing certain clothing for specific events reflects nonmaterial culture. It is noted that material and nonmaterial aspects of culture can vary subtly from region to region. As people travel farther afield, moving from different regions to entirely different parts of the world, certain material and nonmaterial aspects of culture become dramatically unfamiliar.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Compare and contrast the different types of deviance
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OER Text materialCrime and the LawChapter 7, subsection 7.3. At this subsection various types of crimes – violent crimes, non-violent crimes, street crimes, corporate crimes, and victimless crimes – are compared and contrasted. In addition, primary and secondary deviance are compared and contrasted.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Define and explain basic terms and concepts related to deviance.
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OER Text materialDeviance and ControlChapter 7. In this chapter, several concepts related to deviance are defined and explained. Such concepts include deviance, social control, sanctions, and social order.General Comments on this Section:Data on hate crime is too old – 2009/10Two typos in the chapter at pages 142 AND 144The concept of “Formal sanctions” is used in the chapter. It should be added that formal sanctions are the same as lawsA Table is needed for Merton’s Mode of Adaptation

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Describe and analyze society’s changing solutions to the problems of deviance
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OER Text materialCrime and the LawChapter 7, subsection 7.3. The society’s solution to the problems of deviance is through the criminal justice system. This involves the use of the police, the courts, and the corrections system. The police are a civil force in charge of enforcing laws and public order at a federal, state, or community level. A court is a system that has the authority to make decisions based on law. The corrections system, more commonly known as the prison system, is charged with supervising individuals who have been arrested, convicted, and sentenced for a criminal offense.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Discuss changes in the definition of deviance over time
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OER Text materialDeviance and ControlChapter 7, subsection 7.1. In this subsection examples are given of behaviors that were considered deviant some time ago but now considered normal, and vice versa. For example, in some states the use of marijuana which was considered deviants is now considered normal. Throughout the chapter, examples of changes in the definition of deviance are given.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Explain the major theories of deviance.
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OER Text materialTheoretical Perspectives on DevianceChapter 7, subsection 7.2. In this section, functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism are used to explain deviance. Theories under functionalism are Émile Durkheim’s The Essential Nature of Deviance, Robert Merton’s Strain Theory, Social Disorganization Theory, and Clifford Shaw and Henry McKay’s Cultural Deviance Theory. Under conflict theory are theories like Karl Marx’s An Unequal System, and C. Wright Mills’ The Power Elite. Under symbolic interactionism are Labeling Theory, Edwin Sutherland’s Differential Association, and Travis Hirschi’s Control Theory.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Education, Apply the three major sociological perspectives to the issue of education and educational inequalities
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OER Text Material Understanding and Changing the Social WorldThis section provides a very basic overview of Functionalist (most detailed), Conflict (thin) and Symbolic Interactionist (thin) perspectives on education.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Education, Describe how economic development and political ideals influence the emergence of public education
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OER Text materialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social WorldThis section provides a general overview of the history of education in the United States.  It covers how education moved from a the exclusive remit of the wealthy to a public education system due to the needs of an industrial economy and a desire to establish and reinforce “American” values over all others.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Education, Explain how historical and current patterns of social inequality impact education.
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OER Text materialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 16.316.3 reviews the inequalities of educational attainment, the impact education has on income and the influence of education on moral and social attitudes. Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections:, 16.4.1, 16.4.2, and 16.4.516.4.1 reviews how education perpetuates inequality. 16.4.2 reviews the historical and contemporary existence of segregation in schools. 16.4.5 explores why we see social inequalities reflected in the higher education system.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Education, Explore the intersection of gender and educational outcomes globally and in the United States.
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OER Text materialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Section: 16.3.116.3.1 U.S.-centric exploration of the relationship between gender and education.Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Section: 16.4.316.4.3 Brief summary of single sex education and the influence on girls ‘and women’s achievement and self-esteem.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
OER Librarian
Date Added:
05/07/2021