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ACRL Cookbook: Teaching with Primary Sources
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Part of the ACRL Cookbook series, Teaching with Primary Sources, Chapter 23: Community Potluck Chili can be found in Section 5: Teaching with Digital Collections.  This instruction module uses resources from libraries, archives, and civic data organization to understand community history and current community health. 

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Kristin Conlin
Fatemeh Rezaei
Date Added:
05/18/2021
Citizen Participation, Community Development, and Urban Governance in the Developing World, Spring 2007
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Citizen participation is everywhere. Invoking it has become de rigueur when discussing cities and regions in the developing world. From the World Bank to the World Social Forum, the virtues of participation are extolled: from its capacity to ‰ŰĎdeepen democracy‰Ű to its ability to improve governance, there is no shortage to the benefits it can bring. While it is clear that participation cannot possibly ‰ŰĎdo‰Ű all that is claimed, it is also clear that citizen participation cannot be dismissed, and that there must be something to it. Figuring out what that something is -- whether it is identifying the types of participation or the contexts in which it happens that bring about desirable outcomes is the goal of the class.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Baiocchi, Gianpaolo
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Designing Your Life, January IAP 2007
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" This course provides an exciting, eye-opening, and thoroughly useful inquiry into what it takes to live an extraordinary life, on your own terms. The instructors address what it takes to succeed, to be proud of your life, and to be happy in it. Participants tackle career satisfaction, money, body, vices, and relationship to themselves and others. They learn how to address issues in their lives, how to live life, and how to learn from it. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This not-for-credit course is sponsored by the Department of Science, Technology, and Society. A similar, semester-long version of this course is taught in the Sloan Fellows Program. A semester-long extension of the IAP course is also taught to the population at large of MIT (please see PE.550, Spring). Acknowledgment The instructors would like to thank Prof. David Mindell for his sponsorship of this course, his intention for its continued expansion, and his commitment to the well-being of MIT students."

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jordan, Gabriella
Zander, Lauren
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Engineering Capacity in Community-Based Healthcare, Fall 2005
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This multidisciplinary seminar addresses fundamental issues in global health faced by community-based healthcare programs in developing countries. Students will broadly explore topics with expert lecturers and guided readings. Topics will be further illuminated with case studies from healthcare programs in urban centers of Zambia. Multidisciplinary teams will be formed to develop feasible solutions to specific health challenges posed in the case studies and encouraged to pursue their ideas beyond the seminar. Possible global health topics include community-based AIDS/HIV management, maternity care, health diagnostics, and information technology in patient management and tracking. Students from Medicine, Public Health, Engineering, Management, and Social Sciences are encouraged to enroll. No specific background experience is expected, but students should have some relevant skills or experiences.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dakkak, Mary Ann
DelHagen, William
Mack, Peter
Soller, Eric
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Forms of Political Participation: Old and New, Spring 2005
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How and why do we participate in public life? How do we get drawn into community and political affairs? In this course we examine the associations and networks that connect us to one another and structure our social and political interactions. Readings are drawn from a growing body of research suggesting that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities represented by the concepts of civil society and social capital can have important effects on the functioning of democracy, stability and change in political regimes, the capacity of states to carry out their objectives, and international politics.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lily
Tsai
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Heritage Spanish
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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If you have found yourself searching for, adapting or creating materials for your heritage classes because of a lack of readily available commercial resources, this site is for you!

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL)
Date Added:
12/12/2016
Housing and Human Services, Spring 2005
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Focuses on how the housing and human service systems interact: how networks and social capital can build between elements of the two systems. Explores ways in which the differing world views, professional perspectives, and institutional needs of the two systems play out operationally. Part I establishes the nature of the action frames of these two systems. Part II applies these insights to particular vulnerable groups: "at risk" households in transitional housing, the chronically mentally ill, and the frail elderly.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Keyes, Langley C.
Rein, Martin
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Intro to Digital Public History Syllabus
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This course syllabus explores the practice of public history in the digital realm. Students will learn what public history as an academic sub-field is, how it is influenced by internet cultures, and consider its application outside of university settings. Special emphasis will be placed on experiential learning in this course, with a focus on digital oral history as one form of public history practice. Oral history. Students will learn to research and conduct their own online oral history interview.

Subject:
Historiography and Research Methods
Public History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Syllabus
Author:
Aiden Faust
Date Added:
05/10/2021
Japanese Politics and Society, Fall 2008
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CC BY-NC-SA
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" This course is designed for students seeking a fundamental understanding of Japanese history, politics, culture, and the economy. "Raw Fish 101" (as it is often labeled) combines lectures, seminar discussion, small-team case studies, and Web page construction exercises, all designed to shed light on contemporary Japan."

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gercik, Patricia
Samuels, Richard J.
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry, Fall 2003
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Explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, investigating landscapes, and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, detail, place, poetics, and ways of seeing, among other issues. A rudimentary understanding of photography and access to a camera required.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Spirn, Anne Whiston
Date Added:
01/01/2003
"Special Topics: Social Animals, Fall 2009"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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" Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology."

Subject:
Cultural Studies
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Saxe, Rebecca
Date Added:
01/02/2013
Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year, Fall 2006
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The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCluskey, Keith
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Urban Design, Fall 2003
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For many years, Cambridge, MA, as host to two major research universities, has been the scene of debates as to how best to meet the competing expectations of different stakeholders. Where there has been success, it has frequently been the result, at least in part, of inventive urban design proposals and the design and implementation of new institutional arrangements to accomplish those proposals. Where there has been failure it has often been explained by the inability - or unwillingness - of one stakeholder to accept and accommodate the expectations of another. The two most recent fall Urban Design Studios have examined these issues at a larger scale. In 2001 we looked at the possible patterns for growth and change in Cambridge, UK, as triggered by the plans of Cambridge University. And in 2002 we looked at these same issues along the length of the MIT 'frontier' in Cambridge, MA as they related to the development of MIT and the biotech research industry. In the fall 2003 Urban Design Studio we propose to focus in on an area adjacent to Cambridgeport and the western end of the MIT campus, roughly centered on Fort Washington. Our goal is to discover the ways in which good urban form, an apt mix of activities, and effective institutional mechanisms might all be brought together in ways that respect shared expectations and reconcile competing expectations - perhaps in unexpected and adroit ways.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Burns, Carol
De Monchaux, John
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Urban Design Studio: Providence, Spring 2005
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The design of urban environments. Strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development. Involves architecture and planning students in joint work; requires individual designs or design and planning guidelines.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dennis, Michael
Morrow, Greg
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice, Spring 2009
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CC BY-NC-SA
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" This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice."

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Davis, Diane
Date Added:
01/01/2009
World Regional Geography: People, Places and Globalization
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The discipline of geography bridges the social sciences with the physical sciences and can provide a
framework for understanding our world. By studying geography, we can begin to understand the
relationships and common factors that tie our human community together. The world is undergoing
globalization on a massive scale as a result of the rapid transfer of information and technology and
the growth of modes of transportation and communication. The more we understand our world, the
better prepared we will be to address the issues that confront our future. There are many approaches
to studying world geography. This textbook takes a regional approach and focuses on themes that
illustrate the globalization process, which in turn assists us in better understanding our global
community and its current affairs.

Subject:
Geography
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Royal Berglee
Date Added:
01/01/2012