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Abstract Algebra II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is a continuation of Abstract Algebra I: the student will revisit structures like groups, rings, and fields as well as mappings like homomorphisms and isomorphisms. The student will also take a look at ring factorization, general lattices, and vector spaces. Later this course presents more advanced topics, such as Galois theory - one of the most important theories in algebra, but one that requires a thorough understanding of much of the content we will study beforehand. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Compute the sizes of finite groups when certain properties are known about those groups; Identify and manipulate solvable and nilpotent groups; Determine whether a polynomial ring is divisible or not and divide the polynomial (if it is divisible); Determine the basis of a vector space, change bases, and manipulate linear transformations; Define and use the Fundamental Theorem of Invertible Matrices; Use Galois theory to find general solutions of a polynomial over a field. (Mathematics 232)

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Citizenship and Pluralism, Fall 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: - Does justice require granting group-differentiated rights? - Do group-differentiated rights conflict with liberal and democratic commitments to equality and justice for all citizens? - What, if anything, can hold a multi-religious, multicultural society together? Why should the citizens of such a society want to hold together?

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Song, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2003
GroupMaker Instructor Support Application
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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GroupMaker is an application that eases the burden of assigning many papers and presentations to students individually and collectively.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Finance
Management
Communications & Media
Education
Engineering
English as a Second Language
English Language Arts
Health Sciences
History
Physical Science
Professional Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Precha Thavikulwat
Date Added:
09/07/2019
Individuals, Groups, and Organizations, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Develops basic concepts for understanding individual, group, and organizational behavior through critical analysis of important works in the field. Areas covered: cognitive psychology, behavioral decision-making, group process and performance, and organizational culture and adaptation. Emphasizes use of behavioral science concepts for stimulating new and useful behavioral science research. Primarily for doctoral candidates in the Sloan School of Management.

Subject:
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Carroll, John S.
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to organizational psychology, or the application of psychological research and theory to human interaction in the workplace. Industrial/Organization Psychology takes research findings and theories that were originally used to explain general human behavior and applies them to human behavior in the workplace. The course begins by taking a look at how the student evaluates jobs and employees before exploring how the student evaluates and motivate employees, noting what encourages versus discourages employee job commitment. The student will then study leadership and group influences in the workplace, including working conditions, humans factors, performance management, and work teams. Leadership interaction and the leadership theories are also covered. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: perform a thorough and systematic competency model (job analysis); develop and validate a job specific selection design; design, develop, and evaluate a job specific training program; define a performance appraisal process and form; identify research methods for conducting experiments; explain organizational recruitment, selection, and retainment; evaluate the work performance of employees; describe the motivating factors of employees; identify teamwork problems and issues; compare and contrast models of motivation and leadership; explain organizational issues including: teams, attitudes, and occupational health; define work-life balance and its impact on organizations and employees. (Psychology 304)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Managerial Psychology, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Core subject for students majoring in management science. Surveys individual and social psychology and organization theory interpreted in the context of the managerial environment. Laboratory involves projects of an applied nature in behavioral science. Emphasizes use of behavioral science research methods to test hypotheses concerning organizational behavior. Instruction and practice in communication include report writing, team decision-making, and oral and visual presentation.

Subject:
Business and Finance
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Carroll, John S.
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Managing Groups and Teams
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

It is often remarked that groups are everywhere, whether in our social lives, our work lives, or even our families. In each of these situations, sets of individuals decide to work collectively to achieve particular goals.

However, although groups are everywhere and we participate in them constantly, we do not understand them very well. Many of us can tell stories of groups that seemed perfect for a given task, but which failed. And we all have reasons (or excuses) that explain such failures.

But our experiences in groups suffer precisely because we are with them.

The study of groups as a phenomenon that is unique and different from other social phenomena is very active, reflecting both the importance it has and how much we still don't know about groups.

Subject:
Management
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Social Psychology, Spring 2013
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments.

Subject:
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Chorover, Stephan
Date Added:
01/01/2009
"Special Topics: Social Animals, Fall 2009"
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

" Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology."

Subject:
Cultural Studies
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Saxe, Rebecca
Date Added:
01/02/2013
Together: The Science of Social Psychology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory social psychology courses. The 8 units include 27 modules covering key social psych topics such as research methods, group processes, social influence, and relationships. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs. The book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Allan Rossman
Bertram Malle
Beth Chance
Brad J. Bushman
Cynthia L. Pickett
Dan P. McAdams
David A. Schroeder
David Matsumoto
David M. Buss
Dennis L. Poepsel
Donelson R. Forsyth
Jennifer T. Kubota
Jerry M. Burger
Joel A. Muraco
Leslie Zebrowitz
Matthias R. Mehl
Neil Thin
Rajiv Jhangiani
R. Chris Fraley
Robert Biswas-Diener
Stephen Garcia
Tiffany A. Ito
Yanine D. Hess
Date Added:
01/01/2016