Author:
Kristin Conlin, Fatemeh Rezaei
Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Teaching/Learning Strategy
Level:
Community College / Lower Division, College / Upper Division, Adult Education
Tags:
Civic Engagement, Community, Primary Sources
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs

ACRL Cookbook: Teaching with Primary Sources

Overview

Part of the ACRL Cookbook series, Teaching with Primary Sources, Chapter 23: Community Potluck Chili can be found in Section 5: Teaching with Digital Collections.  This instruction module uses resources from libraries, archives, and civic data organization to understand community history and current community health. 

Chapter 23: Community Potluck Chili

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Effectively navigate a discrete digital col-lection, which demonstrates researcher’s comprehension of the information architecture.
  • Identify or ascertain keywords and phrases from collection artifacts to use as search terms to effectively and ef-ficiently search for and obtain relevant results.
  • Perform iterative searching of library da-tabases and assess sources for relevance, quality, and authority. Assessment of sources will narrow the source list to relevant and authoritative resources, creating a better foundation for a project or paper.
  • Identify primary sources and distinguish between digital collections in libraries and archives. Assessment of sources will build comprehension of attributes of different source types.
  • Recognize historical content and connect it to raw data sets from civic data collections to build context and rele-vance between past, present, and future.

RELEVANT RBMS/SAA JOINT GUIDELINES:

  • 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2B, 2D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4F

AUTHORS/CREATORS:

Kristin Conlin, Reference & Instruction Librarian & Fatemeh Rezaei, Archivist at The University of Baltimore

 

NUTRITION INFORMATION:

A hearty and fulfilling meal can be created using ingredients from libraries, archives, and civic data organizations. Using the University of Baltimore’s Special Collections & Archives materials, researchers in an online class environment explore community-led neighborhood redevelopment through the Model Urban Neighborhood Development (MUND) digital collection of images, videos, and community group documentation. Researchers will connect plans and initiatives from the mid-20th century to present-day neighborhood health indicators using civic data made available through Baltimore Neighborhood Indicator Alliance (BNIA).