Hagerstown Information Literacy

Adopting and adapting resources to teach information literacy, research skills, and critical thinking in various courses across the curriculum at Hagerstown Community College
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All resources in Hagerstown Information Literacy

Avoiding Plagiarism Tutorial

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This interactive learning module teaches students how to avoid plagiarism. Upon completing this module, students will understand the definition of plagiarism as well as what and when to cite. Adapted from Clark College's IRIS Avoid Plagiarism tutorial.

Material Type: Assessment, Interactive, Lesson, Module

Citation & Documentation

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Here you’ll find extensive support for APA, MLA, and Chicago documentation styles. This section features instructional videos that show you how to set up your papers in APA, MLA, and Chicago formats, interactive checklists, and visual support for both in-text documenting and referencing at the end of your paper. If you’re new to documentation or just need a refresher, the Citations & Documentation area can help.

Material Type: Module

APA Style Guide

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The standard citation style guide book for the fields of business, education, health science, public service, and social science is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, 2010. The American Psychological Association (APA) publishes the manual. We commonly refer to it as "the APA Manual". The business, education, health science, public service, and social science departments at IRSC recommend APA format for papers written in these fields. Two types of citations are included in most research papers: citations within the text of the document and a list of reference citations at the end of the paper. In-Text Citations: The APA Manual uses the author-date citation system for in-text citations. Reference Citations: The sources you use in your work are included as a separate list at the end of the paper. The APA Manual suggests using the title, References, for the list.

Material Type: Reading

Read Faster, Understand More: Advanced Academic Reading Skills for English Language Learners Compiled by Timothy Krause

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ESOL Reading Level 8 ESOL 260 This advanced academic reading curriculum for English language learners features eight units, each focusing on a different reading skill. Each unit includes presentation slides with a graphic organizer for taking notes; two readings with comprehension questions; academic vocabulary exercises of terms drawn from the readings; and an extension activity. Materials include student textbook, teacher textbook (with answer key and Quizlet links), and presentation slides. Course Description Presents reading as a process that involves determination of purpose, selection and adjustment of strategies, analysis and reflection of underlying meanings, and integration of prior knowledge with new knowledge to address the purpose. Covers content comprehension, textual analysis, critical thinking skills, study skills, and language analysis at the high advanced level. Includes reading diverse texts for a variety of purposes. Includes finding themes and main ideas, analyzing figurative language, summarizing, paraphrasing, evaluating sources and analyzing arguments, inferencing, and using context clues, word forms and common affixes. Prerequisites: ESOL placement test OR successful completion of ESOL 250 AND concurrent enrollment in or completion of (ESOL 252 and ESOL 254) or placement into (ESOL 262 and ESOL 264). Audit available. Intended Outcomes for the course Understand the development of reading as a process that involves determination of purpose, selection and adjustment of strategies, analysis and reflection of underlying meanings, and integration of prior with new knowledge to address the purpose. Acquire and use words and phrases found in high advanced-level academic and everyday texts. Accurately read high advanced level academic and everyday texts which include dense or long complex sentences and paragraphs with appropriate pacing, phrasing, and expression. Choose from a range of strategies, including some sophisticated ones and integrate them to monitor and/or enhance text comprehension. Form and express an opinion and draw conclusions based on the information found in high advanced-level academic and everyday texts.

Material Type: Lesson, Textbook

Author: Timothy Krause

Writing Workbooks for ESOL

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This site contains links to PDF and Word versions of workbooks, along with supplemental materials, for ESOL Writing 6: Paragraph to Essay Workbook and ESOL Writing 8: Academic Essays and Research. Writing 6 Course Description: Review of the writing process and development of the essay. Covers descriptive, narrative, process, and comparison/contrast essays. Review of verb tenses, sentence types, punctuation, and spelling patterns. Introduction to adverb and adjective clauses, reported speech, passive voice, and gerunds and infinitives. Writing 8 Course Description: Develops upper-advanced writing skills. Includes grammar and mechanics, and builds upon expository essay styles by introducing outside research. Explores concepts including but not limited to the cultural expectations related to a U.S. academic environment with an increased emphasis on basic research conventions. This is the fifth course of a five-course sequence.

Material Type: Lecture, Textbook

Author: Davina Ramirez

Information Literacy

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To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. By the end of this unit you will be able to Define Information Literacy, Define the four domains that fall under Metaliterate Learners, Identify a lack of knowledge in a subject area, Identify a search topic/question and define it using simple terminology, Articulate current knowledge on a topic, Recognize a need for information and data to achieve a specific end and define limits to the information need, and Manage time effectively to complete a search.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Information Literacy I

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During your studies you will frequently be asked to write a paper. For such a paper you will need information, but how do you get it? What exactly do you need? Where can you find it? How do you go about it? Almost anyone can use Google, of course, but more is expected of a TU Delft student! We challenge you to go beyond using the popular search engines. This instruction will help you discover what there is to learn about information skills.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Library TU Delft

The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook

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Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today’s complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one’s life. The Information Literacy User’s Guide will start you on this route to success.The Information Literacy User’s Guide is based on two current models in information literacy: The 2011 version of The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National and University Libraries in the United Kingdom and the conception of information literacy as a metaliteracy, a model developed by one of this book’s authors in conjunction with Thomas Mackey, Dean of the Center for Distance Learning at SUNY Empire State College. These core foundations ensure that the material will be relevant to today’s students.The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Textbook

Authors: Allison Hosier and Tor Loney, Daryl Bullis, Deborah Bernnard, Greg Bobish, Irina Holden, Jenna Hecker, Trudi Jacobson

Research for the 21st Century (LIBR 180)

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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: develop and research a topic of global significance; recognize authors‰ŰŞ arguments and the political, social and economic motivations behind their work; demonstrate the ability to locate, interpret and cite the relevant and appropriate information resources on a topic; and, demonstrate an understanding of the information research process.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Lesson Plan, Reading, Syllabus

Information and Society

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This course primarily introduces learners to the evolutions that information as a product has gone through with respect to its creation, use, dissemination, and management along with its impact on the development and history of societies. The module covers several issues about information and society’s evolutions over time driven by technological advancements. It is designed in order to empower learners and equip them with the necessary skills on its strategic use.

Material Type: Module

Author: Dessalegn Menaquint

English Composition 2

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Composition 2 is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Composition 1, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of persuasive prose including documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process and information literacy.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

English Composition II (ENGL 102)

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This is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Basic English Composition 101, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches you research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of expository and persuasive prose including properly documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process or ‰ŰĎinformation literacy‰Ű: your ability to locate, evaluate and use information effectively. You also will recognize academic audiences, increase your clarity and objectivity, and adhere to standard formats.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Syllabus

English Composition I

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This course promotes clear and effective communication by sharpening critical thinking and writing skills. The first unit is designed to change the way in which students think about writing--as a conversation rather than a solitary act. The second unit focuses on academic writing and explores the PWR-Writing or Power-Writing Method (PWR Pre-Write, Write, Revise). The remaining units will focus on the minutiae of good writing practices, from style to citation methodology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate mastery of principles of grammar, usage, mechanics, and sentence structure. Identify the thesis in another individual's essay. Develop a thesis statement, structure it in an introductory paragraph, and support it with the body of the essay. Organize ideas logically within an essay, deploying adequate transitional devices to ensure coherence, flow, and focus. Differentiate between rhetorical strategies and write with an awareness of rhetorical technique and audience. Differentiate between tones and write with an awareness of how tone affects the audience's experience. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking for reading and writing purposes. Quote, paraphrase, and document the work of others. Write sentences that vary in length and structure. (English 001)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Composing Ourselves and Our World: A Guide to First Year Writing

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This textbook is meant for first year English Composition Courses. The text covers the essentials of composition and rhetoric in a recursive manner and introduces research skills. When you are eager to get started on the coursework in your major that will prepare you for your career, getting excited about an introductory college writing course can be difficult. However, regardless of your field of study, honing your writing skills—and your reading and critical-thinking skills—gives you a more solid academic foundation. In college, academic expectations change from what you may have experienced in high school. The quantity of work you are expected to do is increased. When instructors expect you to read pages upon pages or study hours and hours for one particular course, managing your work load can be challenging. The quality of the work you do also changes. It is not enough to understand course material and summarize it on an exam. You will also be expected to seriously engage with new ideas by reflecting on them, analyzing them, critiquing them, making connections, drawing conclusions, or finding new ways of thinking about a given subject. Educationally, you are moving into deeper waters. A good introductory writing course will help you swim.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amy Locklear, Angela Fowler, Elizabeth Burrows, Heath Fowler

English Composition I (ENGL 101)

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English 101 focuses on the analysis of basic human issues as presented in literature with an emphasis on analytic reading, writing and discussion, and on development of argumentative essays based on textual analysis, with attention to style, audience and documentation. By writing several analytical, thesis-driven essays which show engagement with and understanding of a variety of texts, students will practice the critical thinking, reading and writing skills which comprise an important component of college and university studies as well as clear, audience-appropriate communications in other professional settings.This class is comprised of a series of three units, each of which is centered around an essay assignment. For each unit, in addition to the essay itself, you‰ŰŞll be asked to respond to reading assignments and to complete exploratory writing assignments. You‰ŰŞll do a lot of reading and writing, and your instructor will ask you to respond to ideas from our texts, from specific assignments, and from each other. Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Lesson Plan, Reading, Syllabus