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20th Century Art
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Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, surveying the artwork of Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, and Modern and Postmodern architecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
African Art
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This course will introduce the student to the art and architecture of Africa from a Western art historical perspective. This course will emphasize the role of art as manifested in the lifestyles, spiritualities, and philosophies of particular African societies, while also broaching aesthetic principles and the study and display of African art. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of transitions in the national geography of the African continent from the 17th century to the present; demonstrate an understanding of the ethnic diversity and distinct cultural traditions among people of Africa; identify and discuss materials and techniques employed in the creation of a range of African artistic and architectural works; discuss the functions and meanings of a range of African art forms; identify traditional styles and forms strongly associated with particular cultural groups. (Art History 304)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Cultural Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
American Art
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This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Architectural Design Workshop: Collage - Method and Form, Spring 2004
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This class investigates the theory, method, and form of collage. It studies not only the historical precedents for collage and their physical attributes, but the psychology and process that plays a part in the making of them. The class was broken into three parts, changing scales and methods each time, to introduce and study the rigor by which decisions were made in relation to the collage. The class was less about the making of art than the study of the processes by which art is made.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jarzombek, Mark
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Art Appreciation and Techniques
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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Cultural Studies
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Art Historical Methodologies
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This course is an introduction to the major methodologies used by art historians. Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain what art historians study and what kinds of questions they ask about works of art; Identify major art historical methodologies and their associated theories and theorists; Write a critical summary of a piece of art historical scholarship; Explain the major aspects of the methodological approaches outlined in this course and how they relate to the philosophical, historical, and social context in which they first appeared; Explain how different methodologies can be used to analyze works of art; Compare and contrast major art historical methodologies; Use different art historical approaches to interpret, analyze, and write about works of art. (Art History 301)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Art History
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The history of Art is long and varied, spanning tens of thousands of years from ancient paintings on the walls of caves
to the glow of computer-generated images on the screens of the 21st century.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
02/27/2015
Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East
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This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East. This course will explore how artifacts and monuments can be used to study the history and culture of the ancient world. It is divided into two units that chronologically focus on the art, architecture, and archaeology of each region. The first unit examines Ancient Egyptian tombs, monuments, and art from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE) through the Roman (30 BCE- 4thcentury CE) periods. The second unit focuses on Ancient Near Eastern artistic and architectural traditions from the late Neolithic (c. 9500-4500 BCE) through the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550-330 BCE) by Alexander the Great. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify major ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern architectural sites, monuments, and works of art; Identify the general characteristics of ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern art and recognize the names and characteristics of the major art historical time periods of each region; Describe how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of Ancient Egypt and the Near East; Explain ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern cosmology, conceptions of the afterlife, and kingship, as well as their relationship to architectural sites, monuments, and works of art. (Art History 201)

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Art of Ancient Greece and Rome
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In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of ĺÎĺĺĺŤgeometric art (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain why ancient Greek and Roman art can be studied together as ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe art of Classical Antiquity; Trace the timeline of major events in Ancient Greece and Rome; Link important developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome to specific geographical contexts; Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on artĺÎĺĺÎĺs evolution in Ancient Greece and Rome; Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Ancient Greek and Roman art; Discuss important artworks, presenting relevant information on each workĺÎĺĺÎĺs historical context and constitution; Discuss important artists in terms of the style of their work. (Art History 202)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Art of the Islamic World
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This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Subject:
Art History
Cultural Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Arts of Asia
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This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. It first examines Indian Art, focusing on Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic art and architecture. Then, the student will cover the arts of China, detailing the interaction between art, politics, and culture throughout Chinese dynastic history. Lastly, the course discusses Japanese Art, exploring the effects that various sub-traditions and sub-cultures had on the art of Japan. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify major pre-modern Indian, Chinese, and Japanese works of art and architecture; identify the major art historical time periods in India, China, and Japan and the important artistic developments that occurred during each of them; recognize how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of India, China, and Japan; look at, analyze, and compare and contrast different types of Asian art. (Art History 305)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Arts of Latin America
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A chronological and thematic survey of the major themes and developments in the history of Latin American art, covering the pre-Columbian period, European Conquest, and modern and contemporary art across the Americas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Cultural Studies
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Baltimore 20th Century History
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Learning about primary sources in an archives where students can see and examine materials is a unique opportunity. This exercise aims to provide a similar level of hands-on active learning while students attend a synchronous class online.

This text is intended to help students understand how to use primary sources and how to research at the University of Baltimore Special Collections & Archives in order to explore potential research topics regarding 20th century social history, arts history, cultural history, and more, in Baltimore, Maryland. The class activity is designed to be completed synchronously in an online learning environment using video conference tools such as Zoom in order to provide students with a collaborative group based experience.

Subject:
Art History
Cultural Studies
History
Public History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Laura Bell
Date Added:
05/10/2021
Baroque Art to Neoclassicism
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This course will examine the history of Western art from approximately 1600 to approximately 1800 period that bridges the gap from the Renaissance to the earliest days of the Modern era. Beginning with the Baroque in Counter-Reformation Italy and concluding with Neoclassicism in the late 18th century, the student will trace the stylistic developments in Europe and America through a variety of religious, political, and philosophical movements. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify works of art from the Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical periods and be able to distinguish between these different periods; Discuss and identify the oeuvre of the major artists working in Western Europe from 1600-1800; Explain and identify the regional and cultural differences between works of art produced in the same period (i.e., Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, or Neoclassical); Recognize important works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods, recalling such information as date of creation, artist, patron (if known), medium, and period; Recognize the features (stylistic and iconographic) typical of each period studied; Explain and discuss the general arc of Western history from approximately 1600-1800, as seen through the lens of the arts; Explain the forces influencing the change in style and subject matter in Western art from 1600-1800; Discuss the sources of influence (from previous historical periods as well as from neighboring geographical regions) that affected art produced from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Compare and contrast works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods to those of other periods and cultures; Describe the methods and materials used to create works of art from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Explain the ways in which Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical art reveal the social, religious, and political mores of their respective times and places. (Art History 207)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Buddhist Art
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This course serves as an introduction to the Buddhist artistic traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas. It starts with the core tenets of Buddhism, Buddhist iconography, and early Buddhist art and architecture in India, then progresses to Southeast Asia. The course then focuses on Vajrayana Buddhism and its artistic traditions in the Himalayas, then examines Mahayana Buddhist art and architecture in China, Korea and Japan. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Buddhism, major Buddhist schools, and basic Buddhist iconography; identify major works of Buddhist art and Buddhist monuments from South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas; identify the major developments in Buddhist doctrine and Buddhist art and architecture, as well as the relationship between the two as the religion spread throughout Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Himalayas. (Art History 406)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Contemporary Art
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Contemporary art denotes a specific period of art starting in the 1960s that is characterized by a break from the modernist artistic canon and a desire to move away from the dominant Western cultural model, looking for inspiration in everyday and popular culture. This course focuses on Western art and culture, yet also explores a selection of contemporary art around the globe. The student will examine a variety of specific aesthetic and social issues and look at the different strategies contemporary artists proposed and used in their work. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify significant works of contemporary art and visual culture; describe the difference between modernist and contemporary works of art; explain the geographical shift of artistic centers from Europe (Paris) to the United States (New York), and then in the 21st century to a global spreading (Asia and Africa); define and discuss the development of contemporary art as a series of different cultural, social, and political inquiries over the past 50 years; identify and discuss multiple and vital relationships between contemporary art and such broader social and cultural issues as ideology, gender, race, or ethnicity; describe and explain a relationship between different contemporary art strategies, such as performance or installation, and their immediate social and cultural context; discuss how important contemporary artworks relate to their social and historical contexts; define contemporary art as a continuing, international artistic project; identify and define the importance of contemporary art and contemporary visual culture in today's increasingly globalized world. (Art History 408)

Subject:
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Early Christian and Byzantine Art
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In this course, the student will study the history of Eastern (Orthodox) Christian art. The course begins with the emergence of Christianity and the formation of the Christian visual language that grew out of the Classical tradition. The course then follows the development of Christian art after the fall of the Roman Empire and the emergence of the Byzantine Empire. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify works of art from Early Christian and Byzantine culture, recalling such information as date of creation, artist (if known), patron (if known), medium, and culture (i.e. Early Christian, Early Byzantine, Middle Byzantine, Late Byzantine); recognize the features (stylistic and iconographic) typical of the arts of the early Christian and Byzantine world; explain and discuss the general arc of the history of Early Christian and Byzantine culture; describe the significance and function of works of art produced in Early Christian and Byzantine culture; discuss the sources of influence (from previous historical periods as well as from neighboring geographical regions) that affected Early Christian and Byzantine art; compare and contrast works of early Christian and Byzantine art to those of other cultures; explain the relationship between Christianity (and Early Christian art) and Byzantine culture, and discuss the symbiotic nature of this relationship; describe the methods and materials used to create works of Early Christian and Byzantine art; explain the ways in which Early Christian and Byzantine art reveals the social, religious, and political mores of the culture. (Art History 401)

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar, Spring 2008
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" This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture."

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jarzombek, Mark
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Interrogative Design Workshop, Fall 2005
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This course is designed in the tightly controlled space between (national) security and (civil) liberty, student projects, guest presentations, readings and workshop discussions will attempt to develop positive answers to these questions. More specifically, the course will focus on the psychological, economical and political conditions of those who are marginalized and therefore deprived of parrhesia today: the silent victims and witnesses of any kind of social and cultural exclusions. "Parrhesia" was an Athenian right to frank and open speaking, the right that, like the First Amendment, demands a "fearless speaker" who must challenge political powers with criticism and unsolicited advice. Can designer and artist respond today to such a democratic call and demand? Is it possible to do so despite the (increasing) restrictions imposed on our liberties today? Can the designer or public artist operate as a proactive "parrhesiatic" agent and contribute to the protection, development and dissemination of "fearless speaking" in Public Space.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wodiczko, Krzysztof
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Introduction to Western Art History: Pre-historic to High Gothic
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In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of the High Gothic period in fourteenth-century Europe. The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the medieval period. Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the general arc of the history of the Western world, from Prehistory through the end of the medieval period; identify the major historical events in Western history and the roles of various religious and political leaders in these events; demonstrate an understanding of the vital role that imagery played as various cultures have sought to perpetuate religious, political, and cultural ideologies; understand the relationships between various cultures over timeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜhow cultures build on the traditions of older cultures to create something new; identify the major stylistic developments in Western art from Prehistory through the end of the Medieval period; discuss the different techniques used by Western artists from the Prehistoric through the Medieval periods and understand which techniques were favored by which cultures; demonstrate an understanding of how technological developments over the course of history changed the appearance, function, and reception of works of art; identify the culture and art-historical period in which works of art were created, based on an understanding of distinctive stylistic features; demonstrate an understanding of how cultures coexisting in different geographical regions related to one another, and how artistic styles were transmitted from one region to another; identify specific monuments and be able to provide basic identifying information: title, date, location, artists, patrons, and art-historical period (i.e. Prehistoric, Egyptian, Ancient Near East, Gothic, etc). (Art History 110)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Cultural Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
10/24/2019