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Action Research for Educational, Professional, and Personal Change, Fall 2007
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This course covers techniques for and critical thinking about the evaluation of changes in educational practices and policies in schools, organizations, and informal contexts. Topics include quantitative and qualitative methods for design and analysis, participatory design of practices and policies, institutional learning, the wider reception or discounting of evaluations, and selected case studies, including those arising from semester-long student projects.

Subject:
Education
Professional Studies
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Professor Peter Taylor
Date Added:
05/23/2019
American Government (POLS 202)
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CC BY
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This course covers American Government: the Constitution, the branches of government (Presidency, Congress, Judiciary) and how politics works: elections, voting, parties, campaigning, policy making. In addition weęll look at how the media, interest groups, public opinion polls and political self-identification (are you liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican or something else?) impact politics and political choices. Weęll also cover the basics in economic, social and foreign policy and bring in current issues and show how they illustrate the process.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
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CC BY
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
The American Renaissance
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CC BY
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The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
American Sign Language I (ASL 121)
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CC BY
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ASL I is an introduction to the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
American Sign Language II (ASL 122)
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CC BY
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ASL II is a sequential course following ASL I, which continues to build knowledge of the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to continue to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
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CC BY
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ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Cultural Studies
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Art Appreciation (ART 100)
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CC BY
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This is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. The course includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative process and thought. Visual and performing arts are part of the Humanities: academic disciplines that study the human condition and, in addition to the arts, include languages, literature, law, history and religion. This course will teach students to develop a five-step system for understanding visual art in all forms based on description, analysis, meaning, context and judgment.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Cultural Studies
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2008
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An introduction to the main techniques of Artifical Intelligence: state-space search methods, semantic networks, theorem-proving and production rule systems. Important applications of these techniques are presented. Students are expected to write programs exemplifying some of techniques taught, using the LISP lanuage.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Professor Wei Ding
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Black Lives Matter Fall 2016 Syllabus – Black Lives Matter Syllabus
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Some Rights Reserved
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This Gallatin seminar links the #blacklivesmatter” movement to four broader phenomena: 1) the rise of the U.S. prison industrial complex and its relationship to the increasing militarization of inner city communities 2) the role of the media industry in influencing national conversations about race and racism and 3) the state of racial justice activism in the context of a neoliberal Obama Presidency and 4) the increasingly populist nature of decentralized protest movements in the contemporary United States. In this course we will be mindful of an important distinction between #blacklivesmatter (as an emergent movement that has come into existence within roughly the past three years) vs. a much older and broader U.S. movement for black lives that has been in existence for several centuries (which can be traced back to at least the first slave uprisings in the antebellum south). Part of our goal then, we be to think about how the former has been influenced by the latter and to what ends. Among the many topics of discussion that we will debate and engage this semester will include: the moral ethics of black rage and riotous forms of protest; violent vs. nonviolent civil disobedience; the hyberbolic media myth of “black on black” crime; coalitional politics and the black feminist and LGBTQ underpinnings of the #blacklivesmatter movement; the similarities and differences between the blacklivesmatter movement and the U.S. civil rights movement; and the dynamics of political protest among the millennial and post-millennial generations.

Our reading material will often be supplemented with live, in-person dialogues with contemporary grassroots activists who are currently involved in the movement. Through our readings and direct engagements with activists on the frontlines, we will ask: How, when, and in what ways is it possible for us to stand in formation against the treacherous legacies of capitalist patriarchal white supremacy?

Subject:
Cultural Studies
U.S. History
Social Science
Cultural & Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Author:
Frank Leon Roberts
Date Added:
04/04/2021
Business Calculus (MATH 148)
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CC BY
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MATH&148 is a calculus course for business students. It is designed for students who want a brief course in calculus. Topics include differential and integral calculus of elementary functions. Problems emphasize business and social science applications. Translating words into mathematics and solving word problems are emphasized over algebra. Applications are mainly business oriented (e.g. cost, revenue, and profit). Mathematical theory and complex algebraic manipulations are not mainstays of this course, which is designed to be less rigorous than the calculus sequence for scientists and engineers. Topics are presented according to the rule of four: geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. That is, symbolic manipulation must be balanced with graphical interpretation, numerical examples, and writing. Trigonometry is not part of the course.

Subject:
Calculus
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Business Law (BUS 201)
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CC BY
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In this course students will learn how to: Demonstrate an understanding of law, its historical development, judicial process, and the role of law in a complex social system, with emphasis on the American legal system and its institutions; Demonstrate the ability to analyze fact patterns in accordance with the legal professional case analysis method; to apply appropriate vocabulary and substantive legal principles; and then to analyze, compare, and evaluate the logic, reasoning, and arguments of other students, in accordance with established legal principles; Demonstrate the ability to complete a group project with other students, by identifying the applicable legal issues in a case or proposed statute, debating those issues, and producing a live course presentation; Identify and describe the basic principles of major business law subjects, such as constitutional authority to regulate business; common law contracts; the Uniform Commercial Code; agency; business associations; real and personal property and business-related torts; And identify and describe approaches to business ethics, social responsibility, and justice, and, demonstrate the ability, when confronted with an ethical dilemma, to weigh the arguments for alternative courses of action, and logically and persuasively argue for a particular course of conduct.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Business Law and Ethics
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CC BY
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0.0 stars

Law, in its simplest form, is used to protect one party from another. For instance, laws protect customers from being exploited by companies. Laws protect companies from other companies. Laws even protect citizens and corporations from the government. However, law is neither perfect nor all encompassing. This course will introduce the student to the laws and ethical standards that managers must abide by in the course of conducting business. Laws and ethics almost always shape a company's decision-making process; a bank cannot charge any interest rate it wants to charge that rate must be appropriate. By the end of this course, the student will have a clear understanding of the legal and ethical environment in which businesses operate. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify sources of law in the United States; Describe the function and role of courts in the US legal system; Differentiate litigation from methods of alternative dispute resolution; List the elements of the major torts; List the essential elements of a valid contract; Describe how a contract can fail; Summarize the remedies available for breach of contract; Distinguish between real and personal property; Identify the various interests in real property and how they pass; Identify the requirements to hold various rights under intellectual property laws; Analyze the impact of the digital era on intellectual property rights; Distinguish between at-will employment and contractual employment; Identify laws that generally regulate the employer-employee relationship; Identify criminal acts related to the business world; Define white collar crime; Describe the various forms of business organization; Identify the major laws regulating business in the United States; Identify major ethical concerns in business today. (Business Administration 205)

Subject:
Business and Finance
Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Business Statistics
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CC BY
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0.0 stars

Introductory survey of quantitative methods (QM), or the application of statistics in the workplace. Examines techniques for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data in any number of fieldsĺÎĺ from anthropology to hedge fund management.

Subject:
Business and Finance
Management
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Calculus I
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CC BY
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This course begins with a review of algebra specifically designed to help and prepare the student for the study of calculus, and continues with discussion of functions, graphs, limits, continuity, and derivatives. The appendix provides a large collection of reference facts, geometry, and trigonometry that will assist in solving calculus problems long after the course is over. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and LĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_hopitalĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at a given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context, and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, common transcendental functions, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems, and calculate slopes and rates for function given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using NewtonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; festate in words the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to an answer; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses, and which parts are conclusions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 005)

Subject:
Calculus
Functions
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Calculus III, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is an introduction to the calculus of functions of several variables. It begins with studying the basic objects of multidimensional geometry: vectors and vector operations, lines, planes, cylinders, quadric surfaces, and various coordinate systems. It continues with the elementary differential geometry of vector functions and space curves. After this, it extends the basic tools of differential calculus - limits, continuity, derivatives, linearization, and optimization - to multidimensional problems. The course will conclude with a study of integration in higher dimensions, culminating in a multidimensional version of the substitution rule.

Subject:
Calculus
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Catalin Zara
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Calculus III (MATH 153)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This contemporary calculus course is the third in a three-part sequence. In this course students continue to explore the concepts, applications, and techniques of Calculus - the mathematics of change. Calculus has wide-spread application in science, economics and engineering, and is a foundation college course for further work in these areas. This is a required class for most science and mathematics majors.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Calculus
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Calculus II (MATH 152)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This contemporary calculus course is the second in a three-part sequence. In this course students continue to explore the concepts, applications, and techniques of Calculus - the mathematics of change. Calculus has wide-spread application in science, economics and engineering, and is a foundation college course for further work in these areas. This is a required class for most science and mathematics majors.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Calculus
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011